Matthew Friesen

Connector, learner, beginner, coach.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Bringing mindfulness to corporate environments (and doing it while wearing Chuck Taylors)

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

Grade 1, when, as a young boy, I dyed my hair green and wore red nail polish (no, not for Christmas).

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Be your whole self – all the time. Don’t create a “work persona” that you have to live up (or down) to.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Seeing everything as connected – staying away from “us vs. them”. I see being a rebel as a paradox – celebrating uniqueness and diversity while recognizing our inter-connectedness.

What’s your favorite question?

Am I willing to consider that my generalization may be inaccurate or misleading?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When I see someone reflecting deeply on a question or perspective. If I’m helping someone to view something through a different lens, I’m effecting change.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

That we CARE and we want the world to be a better place.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Learn.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Learn.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Everywhere people are suffering.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Einstein.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

That’s not how we do things here…

Florence Pat Haseltine

Fighter and tireless promoter for the advancement of women. Former Director of the Center for Population Research of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. At the NIH, led the way for advances in reproductive research and other critical health areas.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

I changed the way women’s health is viewed. Women were not included in clinical trials and therefore the medical research negated their existence. Although I started out to improve the research education and funding for Obstetrics and Gynecology, the work quickly exploded into women’s health research in general. Another part of that was writing a snippet of legislation thatstarted a program to repay medical scientists’ debt.

When did you first realize that you were a rebel?

Probably age five to six. I looked at my mother and decided I did not want to be like her. I decided I could look at my environment and see it better than my parents and do what I need to and change it. I quickly learned not to trust authorities rules.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Pay attention to “What you pay attention to.”  This is what will give you the most validity when you want to change the system. Don’t buy into someone else’s rebellion unless it hits your core values.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Focus

What’s your favorite question?

“How do we do it?”

What tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When I give a talk for the first time usually very few people show up (sometimes one or two), but by the time I give it the third time, there are at least 25 people. Later I don’t have to give the talk, someone else does and there are a 1,000 + people and they say something I did not know.

What do you think is most important for people to understand about rebels?

We do not like to repeat ourselves.

What’s your one sentence piece of advice for rebels?

Don’t take NO for an answer, it just means that that person will not help you, it does not mean you cannot do it.

What’s your one sentence piece of advice for non-rebels?

“Don’t’ be afraid of change.”

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

In teaching

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Margaret Sanger

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

“No”

 What do you think needs to be done next?

Get rid of loans for education.

Matthew T. Fritz

Leader: Husband, Father, Pilot, Officer; Leader and mentor in the field of complex organizational change, emotional intelligence, and organization strategy.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Creating a public forum for military senior leaders to openly blog about relevant leadership topics and insights.  Facilitating emotional intelligence skills to a crowd of military and civilian leadership in a well-entrenched, fully-dogmatic ecosystem.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

In my early 20’s, I was given an opportunity to attend the Tice Institute to become an Investment in Excellence facilitator.  Upon return, I dutifully started facilitating sessions with teammates in my large organization.  It was at that moment that the words which were coming out of my mouth were a foreign-language to many in the government/military structure.  Teammates were motivated to action via what seemed to me as simple, foundational concepts.  That was when I knew something was different–and that I had a responsibility to continue championing character and organizational-change opportunities.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Seek opportunities to differentiate yourself from the herd, build your brand and cultivate your reach.  Build a platform as early as possible.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Humor!  Without it, one can only be frustrated.

What’s your favorite question?

Hello (insert first name here), how are you feeling today?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When there is a hunger for more!  It is hard to feel full on a few spoonfuls–belly up to the buffet!

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

Dissidence doesn’t have to be disruptive.  And disruptive doesn’t have to be disempowering.  Peaceful dissidence–leading from the front–is a responsibility.  Otherwise, the status quo lives, grows and suffocates.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

ENGAGE!

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Acquire.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

In our families, our classrooms and in our communities.  Everyone leads–it’s where we choose to follow our passions that counts.  Each of us has the innate capability to affect our effect, wherever we are, regardless of our role.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Billy Mitchell.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

We’ve always done it this way.  {Whoa, boy . . . Good luck!}

John Follis

Award-winning Mad Man/agency owner turned ‘Marketing Therapist’ to biz owners across the US.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Walking away from the prestige and money of a business partnership that was highly successful on the outside, but without a moral compass on the inside.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When I was about 30 meeting with a professional recruiter who commented that I was “a bit of a rebel.” Not sure what prompted her comment and I initially took it as an insult.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Seek out as much advice as you can from people you respect.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Seeking truth

What’s your favorite question?

Why?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

Wish I knew.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

Just because they challenge the status quo does not mean they’re always wrong and should be eliminated.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Listen.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Listen.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Business.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

John Lennon.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

Do what I say and don’t ask questions.

Jon Feinstein

Focused my career on building an environmental consulting practice and being viewed as a problem solver for complicated projects and policy issues.

What was your most notable rebel experience?

When I attended a private school I led the charge early on to repeal the requirement to wear a blue sport coat , white shirt, and grey flannels as the “uniform.”

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

Growing up in the 70’s provided a lot of opportunity to be a “rebel” and sometimes not even being noticed. I was involved in several controversial environmental movements which were outside the norm and rocked the boat.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

We had no clue that technology was going to change our careers and our lives, I wish there was more insight and discussion on implications and what could be. Even know… What is going to be the next technology revolution which will change our lives like the Internet or iPad ?

What are your favorite rebel characteristics?

Not afraid of asking intriguing questions.

What is your favorite question?

Is this how you really feel ???

What tells you that you’re effecting change?

Sometimes it takes much time to see the results, so, it is rewarding to see an impact which you have influenced become a reality —  unplanned, unscheduled.

What do you think is most important for people to understand about rebels?

We are not threats.  We are not disruptive, just trying to make the world a better place.

What’s your best advice for rebels?

Keep asking questions, and don’t be satisfied with the norm.

What’s your best advice for non-rebels?

Go to Starbucks and meet a rebel.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

They are desperately needed in the environmental movement to deal with major climatic, and ecological issues.

Who is your favorite rebels from the past 100 years?

Ian McHarg

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

What gives you the authority to ask that question?

Maria DeCarvalho

Executive adviser/Episcopal priest/cathedral dean/commodities banker/US Senate aide who helps people realize they have more power than they know.

What has been your most noted rebel accomplishment or experience?

Forging exciting, affectionate, challenging relationships between a diverse Episcopal congregation and both a conservative synagogue and a local mosque.

We began a tradition of shared worship with our Moslem friends after their imam addressed our congregation the Sunday after September 11. He began his sermon by addressing us: “Dear believers.” Tears everywhere. A young African man later told me when he heard imam Ansari speak, he had to ask himself, if I could be this wrong about Moslems could I also be very wrong about my father? He called his Dad in Africa — their first conversation in a decade — and reconciled before the older man died a year later.

We also began welcoming our friend Rabbi Franklin to witness our Palm Sunday celebrations, during which we ritually remembered the Passion — a story that is extremely precious to us and that has been used as a weapon against Jews for thousands of years. It was moving and powerful to realize that we could both honor a story that is sacred to us and see beyond it to someone else’s.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When I represented my high school as a delegate to the Girls’ State convention, sponsored by the VFW Auxiliary. I explained to my hosts that I would not be signing the required pledge to salute the American flag. I was happy to salute the flag and not happy to submit to a requirement that I do it. It was all too ironic. At the end of the week the wonderful — and I absolutely mean that — women of the VFW Auxiliary awarded me the Citizenship scholarship. I think it was for $100.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Don’t be surprised if people who say they agree with you never actually say it in public.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Affection

What’s your favorite question?

What are we not seeing?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

Laughter

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

It can be lonely, scary and sad.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Love.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Playing it safe isn’t safe anymore.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Wherever people are silencing themselves

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Desmond Tutu

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

You’re only doing this because…

Richard Corder

Personally accountable learning leader, executive coach, public speaker, and blessed husband and father. Deeply committed to figuring out how we can make healthcare better through innovation, flipping, rocking the boat, bringing our emotions to work, and listening to those with the quietest voices.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Bringing a non-clinical, unconventionally educated, patient driven, polite and passionate voice to corporate healthcare improvement.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When I failed to get into college and landed the job of my dreams through innovation, hard work and sticking with it.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Celebrate the losses, the failures, the firings and the bumps – they are where the richest lessons live.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Passion.

What’s your favorite question?

How could we make this better?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

People tell you that it feels different to work here, change is coming more easily and they feel more like part of the solution.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

We’re as committed and dedicated as they come, don’t assume that our questions, approaches and energies are borne out of anything other than seeing the world through a different lens.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Proceed until apprehended.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Listen.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Healthcare.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Richard Branson.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

You’re too enthusiastic.

Glenn Cleland

Trailblazer who takes pride in first mover status. Founding Director, Centre for Financial Studies. Founding Member of New Brunswick Investment Management Corporation. First to represent Canada in my region in tennis.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Initially sending a letter to the Ontario Securities commission about a situation that put my client at a financial disadvantage.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

I have learned that I work with people, not for them.  It did not become apparent until my current job where I have total autonomy.  An external partner is trying to slow down my ability to make decisions and that has made me decide to leave the job.  He is a micro manager and he is interfering with what is a top university program in the country – makes no sense.  I am using yourRebel at Work to guide me through the situation.  It is helpful to make sure my approach is sound and I am not missing something.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

The importance of control.  This is the genius of Warren Buffett and the second coming of Steve Jobs at Apple.  By having control, you can make decisions more quickly when the window of opportunity is open.  And you do not compromise your decisions to please your boss – my biggest mistake.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Integrity – not seeking personal gain but, in my case, assisting students/clients to become the best they can be or financially secure.

What’s your favorite question?

What can go wrong?   (I am the Why’s guy in my Investments program – curious, questioning and skeptical – an empirical skepticist.  This is the one question my students know I will always ask about their investment recommendation.  If they do not know the risks, I will avoid the recommendation)

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

My bosses/students realize my suggestions are realistic and benefit the situation at hand.  Usually they ask realistic follow-up questions meaning they are trying to understand my point of view.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

Rebels have the clients’ best interests in mind.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Create a rebel alliance to support you during tough times.  Use them for an exit strategy if you have to.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Keep an open mind to what rebels have to say.  Do not judge them but their ideas.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Bureaucratic institutions where progress is slow (ie governments, universities)

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Nelson Mandela – he realized that the whole Legal System in South Africa was unfair and stayed true to his beliefs even when in jail for 27 years.  I am in awe!!

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

“You don’t know what you are talking about”.  We are usually well prepared and thought about our comments for quite some time.

Yuwen Chen

Life activist and continuous learner.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

During my college years in Taiwan (later 1980’s and early 1990’s), I was a pretty enthusiastic activist in student and social movement. It was a time that any protest in or out of campus needed permission from the authorities. I realized that changes in Taiwan would not happen without rebels’ activation. Voices for changes have to be roared and be heard. If the rule is not right, it is waiting for you to break it.

When did you first realize that you were a rebel?

Since I was a kid.  I know I am and will be a rebel for my whole life. Adults have to persuade me with reasonable and valid arguments; otherwise, they will be flooded with my challenges or questions. I might be forced to be silent or accept their arrangement but my will would not surrender.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Trust your instinct and follow your own guidance.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Jonathan Livingston Seagull. I knew I am Jonathan the first time I read this story (in Chinese) when I was eight or nine years old.

What’s your favorite question?

Too many.

What tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When I see people start taking actions, which they didn’t have courage to do before, and whichmake a difference in their life.

What do you think is most important for people to understand about rebels?

The world is continuously changing and rebels are vibrating sounds presenting the directions about where the changes should be made.

What’s your one sentence piece of advice for rebels?

Love and be truthful to yourselves.

What’s your one sentence piece of advice for non-rebels?

You can make a difference in the world you live.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Creating a holistic vision and a series of executable action plans.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Dalai Lama: wise, humorous and compassionate.

 

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

Go get a job.

John Bordeaux

Veteran, analyst, consultant, grandfather – applying insights from complexity science, organizational theory, and information science (trying) to advance the public sector mission.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

When I began my graduate school journey, I remarked that I could probably finish the degrees without ever setting foot in the library – because of all the resources available via online means. Seven years later, with a Master’s under my belt, I walked into the GMU library for the first and last time to deliver my dissertation: so that it may be stored on microfiche.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When I was hired at a company by a boss who knew me from a previous life. His first words to me: “Now don’t go trying to fix this place. I know you.”

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Don’t climb, lift.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Embracing ambiguity. If this appears in your resume, and I’ve seen a few that lead with it, you have earned the interview.

What’s your favorite question?

Let’s step back, what are we not seeing?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When I hear an executive embrace an idea previously rejected or ignored.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

This isn’t a personal agenda, in fact we know we are committing career-limiting moves. But we can’t help ourselves – and diversity of thought is essential to organizational survival. If you listen, it’s a win-win. Net-net.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Compel.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Listen.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

At the clay layer of firms – where middle management prevents information and ideas from penetrating up or down.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Carmen’s already used Billy Mitchell, who destroyed decommissioned Navy vessels because no one would believe bombers could do that without being shown. Just awesome. But I must choose another. Muhammad Ali.

“Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.”

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

“It is what it is.”

Dannielle Blumenthal

I figure out what people are good at and then empower them to do it – currently, as Director of Digital Engagement at the National Archives (all opinions my own).

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Helping to eliminate the old-fashioned idea that you success means keeping information to yourself. In a collaboration economy, you are valued for your effectiveness at sharing valuable information – appropriately – at just the right place and time.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When I was in summer camp and was happier doing my own thing – painting, playing tetherball, doing ceramics and hanging out with my mom, the camp nurse – over trying to fit in with the cool kids.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

I wish someone had told me to expect to feel alone a lot. To be a rebel by nature means that you will always stand a little bit apart, even when your ideas are accepted as valid.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Un-shockability – when nothing surprises you anymore.

What’s your favorite question?

Why?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

The vibe that people are happy. You can feel it in the air.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

That we are the “good witches,” so to speak. Our advice might hurt, but we are motivated by the desire to help in a way that generates positive results.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Have compassion for other people – they may appreciate you, but they likely don’t understand where it is you’re coming from.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Don’t be so quick to judge. Try to listen to the message underneath the words.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Eliminating poverty, and the systematic oppression of women and children.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Madonna, because she challenged every idea about women, femininity and power that I can think of.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

“Don’t you dare.”

Marie-Anne Bernasconi

A traveler and facilitator, I try to change the world at my own level through collective intelligence and frugal innovation in the company I co-founded : EstreLab.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

I decided that life was about following instinct and passion. I quit my job and built a company based around the dreams I want to achieve. I decided to have a positive impact in this world and therefore shaped the best fitting tool for me to do it : EstreLab.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

I felt a rebel as a kid, when I first noticed that I didn’t want to share regular codes : behavior, clothing, friendships… At that time, I felt rejected and shy. Alongthe years, I learned to turn it into a powerful strength: accept my differences and leverage them to make a difference.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

See positiveness in everything and forgive people that you think do wrong.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Thinking a lot, and doing even more.

What’s your favorite question?

How are you going to handle it when you are successful?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

The people who believe in my actions and trust me.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

Rebels try to understand future trends and act to make things better. In order to do that, they go beyond boundaries and adopt disruptive thinking. They aren’t afraid of multiple realities and of deconstructing stereotypes.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Share.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Open up.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Everywhere : every single organization needs rebels to help it step back from routine and look at the overall picture.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Einstein.

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

You’re naive and inexperienced.

Olivier Bazin

Digital addict obsessed with simplicity, frugal projects and open innovation, I am convinced the human factor is at the heart of the digital revolution.

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

I made a POC in a week when the other team thought it would take 6 months to finish the listing of the requirements.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

When i started to obtain better results while using only workarounds.
I understand the system. I do not accept it as it is. By all means, i work to change it and make it more open and agile.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

Listen carefully to learn how you can make things different.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

I convince people to think out of the box.

What’s your favorite question?

What is the real problem ?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

When i suggest to two people to talk together and they find a solution without me and work together.

Intrapreneurship is being promoted in my company now!

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

It is not about power. It is about happiness.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

You are not alone. Allies are everywhere.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Surf the wave. do not resist.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Public administrations and big companies.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Alan Turing

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

This is how it is. We do it because we have always done it.

Susan Basterfield

Catalyst, Seeker of Connection and Experience, Insatiable Learner

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

On more than one occasion, saying ‘Enough’.  When you start to feel a little bit of your soul dying every morning when you walk into the office, just say ‘enough’.  It doesn’t matter if you don’t have another job to go to, or frankly any idea of what comes next.  You are worth more, and life is too short to spend it with people or in organisations that will never ‘get you’.

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

Since I was six! I have always felt different, no one could ever quite put me into a box.  I’m quite comfortable in many roles, and in my younger years was quite happy wearing many different masks.  Now the masks are off, but I’ve yet to find a box to contain me!

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

You don’t have to be good at everything.  That person next to you is REALLY good at the thing you don’t enjoy.  We all have our own gifts to express, so don’t be selfish!  Every time you do something for efficiency sake or because you think it’s easier if you just do it, you are taking away the other persons opportunity to grow and shine.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

My interrogation techniques 🙂

What’s your favorite question?

Can you give me an example of that?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

Smiles.  Energy.  Questions.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

We have strong principles that are loosely held.  The way we express our opinions sometimes comes across as ‘know it all’, because of our passion.  Please know that our opinions are malleable – and always open to challenge and change.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Persevere

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Courage

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Oh don’t get me started…..but, everywhere.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Helen Clark

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

That’s just the way it is.

Soji Apampa

A Nigerian in pursuit of the Good Society in his homeland

What has been your most notable rebel accomplishment or experience?

Having been told “no” by my boss, I managed to find out from Corporate HQ “who cared” about the issue I was pursuing and “who knows” all the possibilities and options. I linked up with them through people who believed in me and I got the budget I wanted, and executive sponsorship I needed to pull my scheme off. Grudgingly, when I got an award for the effort (all expenses paid ski trip for me and my spouse for one week in Verbier, Switzerland) my boss asked me to “integrate” him into the plan, which I did.  However, I had to watch my back every day for the next few years till I left the company. He wasn’t a happy trouper at all!

When did you first realize that you are a rebel?

From the day I took my first job in 1987 and found too many ridiculous things in the workplace and couldn’t stop questioning and trying to change stuff. In fact, I was propelled so hard internally that I was like a moth to the flame …. I couldn’t help being different or standing out.

What advice do you wish someone had given you earlier in your career?

The fact that all change is political. I did not really start pulling off huge change schemes until I became at peace with the fact I would not always be liked and would not always please everyone. I realised only later that corporate politics is about realising there would always be opposition to one’s ideas and politics is the art of finding ways around, over or through the obstacles whilst minimising the effects of the fallout to one’s career. It takes great personal mastery.  You need to know yourself very transparently and know other actors very well to do this over and over again sustainably. I wish someone had warned methat it is emotionally and mentally draining whether you engage or not.

What is your favorite rebel characteristic?

Seeing what no one else sees out of what seems like a random collection of facts,  and seeing patterns.

What’s your favorite question?

Why?

What one clue tells you you’re effecting positive change?

The debate thickens between those for and those against. I then try to read the energies and reexamine my motives to be sure I am feeling the situation aright …. Never mind the facts … They are never sufficient to indicate success.

What do you think it’s most important for people to understand about rebels?

They can be managed but it takes strong, self-assured, open minded managers to do so. Those “managers” must mentor rather than manage them, facilitate more than control etc.

What’s your one word piece of advice for rebels?

Integrity.

What’s your one word piece of advice for non-rebels?

Faith.

Where do you think rebels are most needed today?

Financial services, healthcare & education.

Who is your favorite rebel from the past 100 years?

Jean Monet

What’s the one thing you should never say to a rebel?

You can’t.