The Curly Hair Rebel Manifesto

A woman came up to me a couple of weeks ago after I spoke on a panel about Diversity and Inclusion in the National Security Sector. She was in her 20s, just trying to start her career. She kept applying for jobs, getting to the final round of interviews, but not getting hired, and was hoping I could give her some advice about getting over that final hurdle.

She told me that she had even considered straightening her naturally curly hair in hopes of making a better impression.

“WHAT?!?”

Her university career counselor had suggested she do that because, presumably, curly hair is not consistent with a serious National Security demeanor.

I had no words…I was with another experienced veteran of the intelligence community. She had tears in her eyes.

How can this still be the case? How can completely irrelevant attributes of individuals impede their ability to contribute to organizations that badly need their help?

Let me get something off my curly hair.carmenpicture I’m not fond of the phrase “Diversity and Inclusion.” Diversity has become the word we use to refer to minorities, thereby implying that only they can bring different opinions to the table. When in reality we are all diverse, curly-haired and straight, and should be heard when we have something to say.

And don’t talk to be about Inclusion. I don’t need to be included.

I BELONG.

Rebels at Work do not need to be included. We belong. Many organizations still don’t appreciate that, but they’re on notice now that the Harvard Business Review has recognized that organizations overvalue conformity.

I’m thinking many rebels have some type of “curly hair” in their background. They differ in some way from the norm in their organization: they think differently, they have an unusual academic degree, they’re square pegs in round holes.

Don’t let others persuade you that your DIFFERENCE is a PROBLEM.

Your DIFFERENCE is your SUPER POWER.

Own it. Wear it. Use it!

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